Swanwick Crosswalk Needs Attention

Swanwick+Crosswalk+Needs+Attention

Andy Bryant, Sting Reporter

Recently a major issue has come up concerning the crosswalk that goes from the end of Swanwick Street by the Salty Dog, across State Street, and to the end of Lincoln Boulevard. For several years now, I have been crossing that perilous crosswalk without the aid of a crossing guard for over four years now. Recently, one Amanda Cross, or Amanda Schwier Cross as she’s known on Facebook, ranted on Facebook about something, in her eyes, that was extremely horrible. She had stopped at the crosswalk while facing the direction of McDonald’s and Walmart to wait for a kid to cross the street at the crosswalk. A person behind her passed her on the right side, which means the person passed Amanda on the shoulder of the road. The person that passed Amanda almost hit the kid in the crosswalk as they were trying to cross.
Amanda was rightfully horrified and appalled at the other driver. So, as soon as she could, Amanda called the Chester Police. In response, the police told Amanda that she “was the only one who has complained.”
Personally, I think this needs to get its way to the school board and the City Council. If the issue does not get resolved soon, I fear that a child will get seriously injured or, God forbidding it, killed at the crosswalk. Personally, due to me being a pessimist on these matters, I think the City will do nothing until someone’s child is seriously hurt, or killed.
Here are my solutions, some of which I have taken from other people:
Solution one: hire a crossing guard to sit at the crosswalk from about 7:20 a.m. until about 8 a.m. every school day, and as well as from 3:00 p.m. until about 3:30 p.m. Monday through Thursday, and from about 2:00 p.m until about 2:30 p.m. after school on Fridays.
Solution two: Put up a big sign that says, “It is the law. Stop if there is someone in their crosswalk.”
Again, to reiterate, I hope City Hall gets the message that we do not want another death of a child. Especially if the aforementioned death could have been easily prevented.